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Fridays for Future Global Climate Change Protests Took Place Across 80 Countries!

Feature Image courtesy of AFP / Getty Images
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Once again, young people across the globe are protesting in solidarity at the blatant lack of action in the face of pressing climate change issues.

On September 24, 2021, grassroots climate movement Fridays for Future led its first global strike since the pandemic took over the world. Started in 2018 by Greta Thunburg, who was only 15 at the time, her school strike against inaction towards climate change not only spurred global conversations, she also started the #FridaysforFuture grassroots movement along with fellow young people, all working together to #UprootTheSystem; a name and hashtag chosen to bring about an intersectional discussion about climate change.

'Don't trash our future,' young activists tell world leaders during climate strike
Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg (centre) and German climate activist Luisa Neubauer march during a Fridays for Future global climate strike in Berlin.
|Image Credit: Tobias Schwarz / AFP Via Getty Images

After being forced to remain within the confines of pandemic SOPs for too long, Uproot the System took off in a fervent blaze last week with an estimated 1,400 events across 80 countries worldwide.

Uproot the System centres MAPA, or “most affected people and areas” platform that rightfully gives importance to indigenous groups and people, as well as regions labeled the “Global South” (parts of Africa, Latin America, Asia, and Oceania).

Leading the strike in Berlin.
Leading the strike in Berlin. | Image Credit: Jörg Carstensen / Picture Alliance Via Getty Images

Overjoyed to be back on the streets, protestors in the U.S., Germany, the UK, Italy, India, Japan, Africa, Pakistan, New Zealand, and the Philippines participated last Friday, among many others. Greta herself was at a rally in Berlin with German climate activist Luisa Neubauer. There were about 420 protest locations all over Germany alone.

Young people protest during the Climate Strike March on September 24, 2021 in Turin, Italy.
Young people protest during the Climate Strike March on September 24, 2021 in Turin, Italy. 
|Image Credit: Stefano Guidi / Getty Images
Young people protest in Turin, Italy. Some 16 cities across Europe have planned climate change protests in demand for intersectional climate justice.
Young people protest in Turin, Italy. Some 16 cities across Europe have planned climate change protests in demand for intersectional climate justice. 
|Image Credit: Tefano Guidi / Getty Images

“Without listening to MAPA (most affected people and areas), embracing intersectionality, and uprooting this system, we have no hope of stopping the climate crisis,” a statement on the Fridays for Future website reads.

Image Credit: @Fridays4future Twitter
Image Credit: @Fridays4future Twitter
Image Credit: @Fridays4future Twitter
Image Credit: @Fridays4future Twitter

A global first, the Fridays for Future worldwide in-person climate strike has also encouraged online protests as many places are still adhering to lockdown procedures. Largely fuelled by young people, the strikes’ sole motive is to apply pressure to governmental bodies “from the streets”.

Demonstrators in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Freiburg listen to speakers.
Demonstrators in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Freiburg listen to speakers. 
|Image Credit: Philipp Von Ditfurth / Picture Alliance Via Getty Images
Participants hold signs during a Fridays for Future global climate strike in Berlin.
Participants hold signs during a Fridays for Future global climate strike in Berlin. 
|Image Credit: TOBIAS SCHWARZ / AFP Via Getty Images

It will interesting to see if this dynamic movement will be noticed by the hundred or so world leaders that are currently discussing issues including climate change at the U.N. General Assembly in New York. This comes ahead of the imminent U.N. COP26 conference, a climate summit of world leaders to be held in Scotland in November.




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